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Cornell University

Teaching

Cornell’s Education Minor gives you a good foundation of teaching principles and field experience. However, you will not be certified to apply as a teacher in a public school with just that minor. Regardless of whether you complete the minor or study a completely different major, there are some teaching options are available to grads, even if they don't have certification. Many of these employers also attend one (or more) of Cornell's career fairs each year. You can often defer on your student loans and/or qualify for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program. Some even help you complete your Masters in Teaching or provide an education award at the end of a year's service.

Common programs include:

  • Public Allies Fellowship. Ten month program with a non-profit, along with leadership and professional training.
  • Student Conservation Association Program. One year fellowship.
  • AmeriCorps. Informal teaching opportunities in all 50 states.
  • Private schools. Many religiously-oriented organizations offer year-long teacher placements.
  • There are many organizations that welcome recent graduates to work in schools with their students. This is a wonderful opportunity! You can develop skills for a future career related to education, or transferable skills like leadership and problem solving that will be useful in any career. You know yourself, your preferences, your requirements, and your goals. Ask yourself: What is my motivation for serving? What do I you see myself doing each day? What resources and support do I want or need? You should also think about what you have to offer a program and it’s community. Feel free to reach out to the recruiters listed in this chart comparing various education leadership programs. For more information about these programs, contact Cornell’s Public Service Careers Coach, Mia Ferraina (mf772@cornell.edu).

You might also consider teaching and educating in a less traditional setting. There are opportunities in museums, nature centers, and other non-profits where you can educate the community in some way outside of the classroom setting. If you are looking to pursue teaching as a long-term career, you should research the certifications required, as these vary by location and age group you want to teach. Requirements can include completing a Masters degree, passing a series of exams, and/or successfully completing of a background check and/or drug test (particularly when working with children).

Resource Library

Education and Teaching Resources

Our Resource Library contains links to many resources that will help you in your search for opportunities in teaching.